Mar 26
A grieving mom whose second child died after just 5 days of life has made his grave into a sandbox so the older sibling can play with his dead brother. Not sure how the 3 year old is processing this. 
Read more here.

A grieving mom whose second child died after just 5 days of life has made his grave into a sandbox so the older sibling can play with his dead brother. Not sure how the 3 year old is processing this. 

Read more here.

Mar 16

Japanese sculptor Yoshitoshi Kanemaki uses giant slabs of camphor wood to make these life sized sculptures. Camphor has a strong fragrance; I wonder what it’s like to be in the room with these? Spooky and unsettling and somehow a very modern version of memento mori.

Via This Is Colossal.

Feb 15
A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It had begun to snow again. He watched sleepily the flakes, silver and dark, falling obliquely against the lamplight. The time had come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was falling on every part of the dark central plain, on the treeless hills, on the Bog of Allen and, farther westward, softly falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling, too, upon every part of the lonely churchyard on the hill where Michael Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.
James Joyce, The Dead
Jan 03
This longread on contemporary Cockney funerals is fascinating. 
Via The Economist.

This longread on contemporary Cockney funerals is fascinating. 

Via The Economist.

Nov 18
The always-excellent Lapham’s Quarterly published this diagram in honor of Halloween (I know, I’m a little slow on the reblog here). It really shows the power that relics continue to hold over our imaginations—that small scrap of someone is the next best thing to being there, still.

The always-excellent Lapham’s Quarterly published this diagram in honor of Halloween (I know, I’m a little slow on the reblog here). It really shows the power that relics continue to hold over our imaginations—that small scrap of someone is the next best thing to being there, still.

Nov 02
This was inevitable: a Tumblr that collects funeral selfies. Because at all events, at all times, the only thing that is of any interest is…ME. Ouch.

This was inevitable: a Tumblr that collects funeral selfies. Because at all events, at all times, the only thing that is of any interest is…ME. Ouch.

Oct 25
It’s Tikker! A watch that counts down the minutes you have left on earth, a modern version of the memento mori timepiece. My only complaint: the thing is plug ugly. Who would want to look at it for the rest of his/her days/hours/seconds left in this mortal coil? Ugh. Still, Tikker has surpassed its  Kickstarter goal of $25K nearly four times over, so clearly people are paying attention to their mortality. Go Team Death!

It’s Tikker! A watch that counts down the minutes you have left on earth, a modern version of the memento mori timepiece. My only complaint: the thing is plug ugly. Who would want to look at it for the rest of his/her days/hours/seconds left in this mortal coil? Ugh. Still, Tikker has surpassed its  Kickstarter goal of $25K nearly four times over, so clearly people are paying attention to their mortality. Go Team Death!

Sep 25

The Fallen is a site specific installation made up of nine thousand silhouettes hand-drawn in the sand on the Normandy beach in memory of the soldiers and civilians who died on D-Day: June 6, 1944. British artists Jamie Wardley and Andy Moss (and 200 volunteers!) created the work over the weekend of September 21 to mark the International Day of Peace. The project was two years in the planning and the results, which were ultimately washed away by the tide, powerfully address the transience of life and the finality of death.

Sep 10

Parishioners at Rev. Robert H. Schuller’s nondenominational Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California, were horrified to learn that the church, during its conversion to a Roman Catholic house of worship, is removing a walkway of 1800 paving stones installed in memory of the dead. There are no plans for reinstallation; the church has created a diocese-sponsored website with digital images of the stones instead. Is this an adequate substitute for the physical memorial stones? Here’s what one tearful mourner told the New York Times“The thought of them being dug up just sends me into tears,” Ms. De Clercq said, crying as she spoke. “I don’t even know if I’m going to live through this. I’ve just been so devastated.”

Sep 09
If metal is immortal, then somewhere
there lies the burnished button I lost
upon my seventh birthday in a garden.
Find me that button and my soul will know
that every soul is saved and stored and treasured.
Vladimir Nabokov, A Forgotten Poet

Me on Twitter

loading...